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BRAGG LIVE FOOD PRODUCTS

June 30, 2011

ONE-DAY JUICE DIET

Filed under: Bragg Health Recipes — Tags: , , — admin @ 11:00 AM

This weekly, one-day juice diet is a super cleanser of body tox­ins. For more cleans­ing and reduc­ing, fol­low with a 1-day
water fast. Read Mir­a­cle of Fast­ing for more information.

A: two 8-oz glasses orange or grape­fruit juice (prefer­ably fresh squeezed is best)

B: one 8-oz glass pineap­ple juice, unsweetened

C: three 8-oz glasses Bragg Apple Cider Vine­gar Drink (pg. 49)

D: two 8-oz glasses tomato juice, salt-free

E: eight 8-oz glasses of the fol­low­ing:
juice of 8 lemons
dis­tilled water to make eight glasses
2 –3 Tbsps raw honey or Ste­via to taste

A through E makes a total of 16 glasses of liq­uid, two to drink each hour. The quan­ti­ties of the above liq­uids may be var­ied; that is, you may use three of orange juice and none of pineap­ple, etc., but the total liq­uid should be one gal­lon dur­ing the day. The results are amaz­ing – you feel light and refreshed – so con­tinue on juice or water another day, if desired. We sug­gest you drink daily the Bragg Healthy “Energy” Smoothie (page 49) after your juice-water diet.

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

August 30, 2010

IS JUICING YOUR GREENS as HEALTHY as EATING THEM?

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , , — admin @ 6:00 PM

No, juic­ing your greens is not nearly as healthy as eat­ing them, pro­vided that you use healthy cook­ing meth­ods when you pre­pare the greens. For exam­ple, if you over­cook the greens, you will lose too many of the nutri­ents they con­tain; in that case, you might be worse off than if you used a juicer. But as long as you use the healthy steam­ing or other cook­ing meth­ods I describe in The World’s Health­i­est Foods book, you’ll get a far greater vari­ety of nutri­ents in the whole greens than in the juice.

CLICK HERE TO SEE ORIGINAL STORY

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

July 13, 2010

Enjoy Raw Live Juices for Health Power

Filed under: Bragg Book Excerpts,Health Articles,Patricia Bragg — Tags: — admin @ 10:45 AM

All over the United States, we have “cock­tail hours,” where fancy alco­holic cre­ations are used to pro­duce new thrills, stim­u­late jaded appetites and bol­ster fail­ing spirits.

We have a new kind of “cock­tail,” thanks to my dad, Paul C. Bragg. It is not made of whisky, gin, rum or other alco­holic sub­stances. There are no toxic maraschino cher­ries to be found in any of them. These live, recharg­ing juices are made from fresh, organically-grown veg­eta­bles and ripe fruits – the very life-blood of the plant – to boost your energy and immune lev­els! Dad imported the first hand-juicers from Europe and at the Bragg Cru­sades intro­duced juice ther­apy across America.

There is no liq­uid on Earth so sat­is­fy­ing as the fresh live juice drink. Not only is it deli­cious, but there is some­thing far greater: the sat­is­fac­tion and nour­ish­ment for the bil­lions of cells that make up your body. When peo­ple take to the health cock­tail habit, they are putting the plants’ liq­uid life into their bod­ies, to super­charge their health!

Con­sider that fruits and veg­eta­bles have been grown nat­u­rally by solar energy (sun­shine). They con­tain all of the ele­ments that the sun and earth have buried deep into their fibrous cells; they are live-cell foods. Juic­ing is a con­ve­nient, inex­pen­sive way to obtain the most con­cen­trated form of nutri­tion avail­able from live whole plant and fruit foods.

Select & Pre­pare Organic Foods for Juicing

Demand and buy organically-grown fruits and veg­eta­bles when­ever pos­si­ble, because com­mer­cial pro­duce can con­tain deadly pes­ti­cides and petro­chem­i­cal fer­til­iz­ers. Yearly, over 2. 6 bil­lion pounds of pes­ti­cides are dumped on Amer­i­can food crops. Because sprays of pes­ti­cides and her­bi­cides are used on so many commercially-grown fruits and veg­eta­bles, be sure to wash and scrub thor­oughly with biodegrad­able soap.

Choose deep-colored, ripe, firm fruits and fresh, healthy veg­eta­bles. Use both the leaves and stems, as well as the body of the veg­etable. They yield an abun­dance of organic min­er­als, even the tops of car­rots con­tain phosphorus

Fruit & Veg­etable Health Power Drinks

Organic, raw, live fruit and veg­etable juices can be pur­chased fresh from many health food stores or pre­pared at home with the won­der­ful juicers and blenders on the mar­ket. These health juices can be used full-strength or diluted with dis­tilled water, con­sumed indi­vid­u­ally or blended as below. Try adding a dash of Bragg Liq­uid Aminos or Bragg Sprin­kle (24 herbs & spices) to veg­etable and tomato com­bi­na­tions for a deli­cious health drink.

When using fresh herbs in these drinks, use 1–2 leaves or a shake of Bragg Sprin­kle (salt-free with 24 herbs & spices) and Bragg Sea Kelp. Both are deli­cious with veg­etable juices.

Healthy, Pow­er­ful Juice and Blended Combinations

• Beet, cel­ery and alfalfa sprouts
• Cab­bage, cel­ery and apple
• Cab­bage, cucum­ber, cel­ery, tomato, spinach and basil
• Tomato, car­rot and all greens
• Car­rot, cel­ery, water­cress, gar­lic and wheat­grass
• Grape­fruit, orange and lemon
• Beet, pars­ley, cel­ery, car­rot, mus­tard greens, and gar­lic
• Beet, cel­ery, kelp and car­rot
• Cucum­ber, car­rot and pars­ley
• Water­cress, cucum­ber, gar­lic, cel­ery, car­rot, kale and chard
• Aspara­gus, car­rot and apple
• Car­rot, cel­ery, pars­ley, cab­bage, onion and sweet basil
• Car­rot, broc­coli, lemon and cayenne
• Car­rot, broc­coli, cel­ery, kale and rose­mary
• Car­rot, coconut and coconut milk
• Apple, car­rot, cel­ery and gin­ger
• Apple, pineap­ple and kiwi
• Apple, papaya and grapes
• Papaya, cran­ber­ries and apple
• Leafy greens, broc­coli and apple
• Grape, blue­ber­ries and apple
• Water­melon (best alone)

Juic­ing has come a long way since my father imported the first hand oper­ated vegetable-fruit juicer from Ger­many. Before, this juice was pressed by hand using cheese­cloth. He intro­duced his new juice ther­apy idea, then pineap­ple juice, then later tomato juice, to the Amer­i­can pub­lic. These two juices were erro­neously thought to be too acid. Now, these health bev­er­ages have become the favorites of mil­lions. TV’s famous Juice­men Jack LaLanne and Jay Kordich say Bragg was their early inspi­ra­tion and men­tor! They both are age­less and are still going strong, inspir­ing mil­lions to health.

Vegetarian Health Recipes ...for Super Energy & Long Life to 120!Purchase This Book

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

October 28, 2009

Vegetable Juice Aided in Dietary Support for Weight Loss and Lower Blood Pressure

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , , , , , — (author unknown) @ 6:00 AM

Decades of stud­ies have doc­u­mented the link between eat­ing a diet rich in veg­eta­bles and mul­ti­ple health ben­e­fits, yet nearly eight out of 10 peo­ple world­wide fall short of the daily rec­om­men­da­tion. Research pre­sented at the Inter­na­tional Sym­po­sium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Veg­eta­bles sug­gests the best approach may be to focus on the fac­tors that are often behind this veg­etable gap: con­ve­nience and enjoyment.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

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