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October 18, 2017

Do You Know Why Organic Is Good for Pollinators

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , , , , — admin @ 9:30 AM

Do You Know Why Organic is Good for Pollinators

Learn More from the Center of Food Safety

Download the Fact Sheet Here

While there are several factors threatening the health of pollinators, there is an overwhelming amount of scientific evidence linking plummeting pollinator populations to pesticide use and illustrating the far reaching impacts that toxic synthetic pesticides have on a wide range of environments. For instance, neonicotinoids—a highly toxic class of systemic insecticides—are a leading culprit in bee declines. Scientists have also linked the endangerment of monarch butterflies to the destruction of milkweed habitat as a result of widespread glyphosate use on genetically engineered crops. Fortunately, there are solutions. Organic is a form of agriculture that is not only good for the planet, but good for pollinators too!

 

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

October 11, 2017

Why Are Pesticide Residues in Foods Growing in Concern?

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , , — admin @ 11:36 AM

Why are pesticide residues in foods growing in concern?

Learn @ the Organic Center here

Do you think eating organic is better for you?
Learn about the populations at risk, pesticides in certified organic food & other key findings in their report.

Organic Fields

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

October 10, 2017

Impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops on Pesticide Use in the United States

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , , — admin @ 2:11 PM

Impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops on Pesticide Use
in the United States: The First Thirteen Years

Learn More @ the Organic Center

This report explores the impact of the adoption of genetically engineered (GE) corn, soybean, and cotton on pesticide use in the United States, drawing principally on data from the United States Department of Agriculture. The most striking finding is that GE crops have been responsible for an increase of 383 million pounds of herbicide use in the U.S. over the first 13 years of commercial use of GE crops (1996- 2008). This dramatic increase in the volume of herbicides applied swamps the decrease in insecticide use attributable to GE corn and cotton, making the overall chemical footprint of today’s GE crops decidedly negative. The report identifies, and discusses in detail, the primary cause of the increase — the emergence of resistant weeds.

The steep rise in the pounds of herbicides applied with respect to most GE crop acres is not news to farmers. Weed control is now widely acknowledged as a serious management problem within GE cropping systems. Farmers and weed scientists across the heartland and cotton belt are now struggling to devise affordable and effective strategies to deal with the resistant weeds emerging in the wake of herbicide-tolerant crops. But skyrocketing herbicide use is news to the public at large, which still harbors the illusion, fed by misleading industry claims and advertising, that biotechnology crops are reducing pesticide use. Such a claim was valid for the first few years of commercial use of GE corn, soybeans, and cotton. But, it is no longer.

An accurate assessment of the performance of GE crops on pesticide use is important for reasons other than correcting the excesses of industry advertising. It is also about the future direction of agriculture, research, and regulatory policy. Herbicides and insecticides are potent environmental toxins. Where GE crops cannot deliver meaningful reductions in reliance on pesticides, policy makers need to look elsewhere. In addition to toxic pollution, agriculture faces the twin challenges of climate change and burgeoning world populations. The biotechnology industry’s current advertising campaigns promise to solve those problems, just as the industry once promised to reduce the chemical footprint of agriculture. Before we embrace GE crops as solution to these new challenges, we need a sober, data-driven appraisal of its track record on earlier pledges.

Dr. Margaret Mellon Director, Food and Environment Program Union of Concerned Scientists
Mr. Mark Retzloff Board Chair, The Organic Center President, Aurora Organic Dairy

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

October 4, 2017

Happy Non-GMO Month

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , — admin @ 10:18 AM

Happy Non-GMO Month

Do you know the impacts of Genetically Engineered Crops on Pesticide Use in the U.S?
The First 13 Years by Charles Benbrook

All Bragg products are Non-GMO

Background

Genetically engineered, herbicide-resistant and insect-resistant crops have been remarkable commercial successes in the United States. Few independent studies have calculated their impacts on pesticide use per hectare or overall pesticide use, or taken into account the impact of rapidly spreading glyphosate-resistant weeds. A model was developed to quantify by crop and year the impacts of six major transgenic pest-management traits on pesticide use in the U.S. over the 16-year period, 1996–2011: herbicide-resistant corn, soybeans, and cotton; Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn targeting the European corn borer; Bt corn for corn rootworms; and Bt cotton for Lepidopteron insects.

Results

Herbicide-resistant crop technology has led to a 239 million kilogram (527 million pound) increase in herbicide use in the United States between 1996 and 2011, while Bt crops have reduced insecticide applications by 56 million kilograms (123 million pounds). Overall, pesticide use increased by an estimated 183 million kgs (404 million pounds), or about 7%.

Conclusions

Contrary to often-repeated claims that today’s genetically-engineered crops have, and are reducing pesticide use, the spread of glyphosate-resistant weeds in herbicide-resistant weed management systems has brought about substantial increases in the number and volume of herbicides applied. If new genetically engineered forms of corn and soybeans tolerant of 2,4-D are approved, the volume of 2,4-D sprayed could drive herbicide usage upward by another approximate 50%. The magnitude of increases in herbicide use on herbicide-resistant hectares has dwarfed the reduction in insecticide use on Bt crops over the past 16 years, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

Learn more here.

 

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

December 14, 2016

Pesticides Could Be to Blame for Parkinsons

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:12 PM

Pesticides could be to blame for Parkinsons

Parkinson’s disease is far from figured out. But a clue has been lurking in cornfields for years,” begins a 2014 Scientific American article. “Farmers are more prone to Parkinson’s than the general population.

parkinson

Pesticides could be to blame

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

September 7, 2010

PESTICIDE EXPOSURE LINKED to ADHD RISK

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , — admin @ 8:00 AM

PESTICIDE EXPOSURE LINKED TO ADHD RISK

Exposure in the womb to pesticides known as organophosphates may increase the chance that children, especially boys, will develop attention problems by age 5, a study shows.

The research is published in Environmental Health Perspectives.

CLICK HERE TO SEE ORIGINAL STORY

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.