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April 17, 2017

Turning #Negative #Thinkers Into Positive Ones

Filed under: Bragg General — admin @ 10:24 AM

Turning Negative Thinkers Into Positive Ones

Learn More from the New York Times

Most mornings as I leave the Y after my swim and shower, I cross paths with a coterie of toddlers entering with their caregivers for a kid-oriented activity. I can’t resist saying hello, requesting a high-five, and wishing them a fun time. I leave the Y grinning from ear to ear, uplifted not just by my own workout but even more so by my interaction with these darling representatives of the next generation.

What a great way to start the day!

When I told a fellow swimmer about this experience and mentioned that I was writing a column on the health benefits of positive emotions, she asked, “What do you do about people who are always negative?” She was referring to her parents, whose chronic negativity seems to drag everyone down and make family visits extremely unpleasant.

I lived for half a century with a man who suffered from periodic bouts of depression, so I understand how challenging negativism can be. I wish I had known years ago about the work Barbara Fredrickson, a psychologist at the University of North Carolina, has done on fostering positive emotions, in particular her theory that accumulating “micro-moments of positivity,” like my daily interaction with children, can, over time, result in greater overall well-being.

The research that Dr. Fredrickson and others have done demonstrates that the extent to which we can generate positive emotions from even everyday activities can determine who flourishes and who doesn’t. More than a sudden bonanza of good fortune, repeated brief moments of positive feelings can provide a buffer against stress and depression and foster both physical and mental health, their studies show.

This is not to say that one must always be positive to be healthy and happy. Clearly, there are times and situations that naturally result in negative feelings in the most upbeat of individuals. Worry, sadness, anger and other such “downers” have their place in any normal life. But chronically viewing the glass as half-empty is detrimental both mentally and physically and inhibits one’s ability to bounce back from life’s inevitable stresses.

Negative feelings activate a region of the brain called the amygdala, which is involved in processing fear and anxiety and other emotions. Dr. Richard J. Davidson, a neuroscientist and founder of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin — Madison, has shown that people in whom the amygdala recovers slowly from a threat are at greater risk for a variety of health problems than those in whom it recovers quickly.

Both he and Dr. Fredrickson and their colleagues have demonstrated that the brain is “plastic,” or capable of generating new cells and pathways, and it is possible to train the circuitry in the brain to promote more positive responses. That is, a person can learn to be more positive by practicing certain skills that foster positivity.

For example, Dr. Fredrickson’s team found that six weeks of training in a form of meditation focused on compassion and kindness resulted in an increase in positive emotions and social connectedness and improved function of one of the main nerves that helps to control heart rate. The result is a more variable heart rate that, she said in an interview, is associated with objective health benefits like better control of blood glucose, less inflammation and faster recovery from a heart attack.

Dr. Davidson’s team showed that as little as two weeks’ training in compassion and kindness meditation generated changes in brain circuitry linked to an increase in positive social behaviors like generosity.

“The results suggest that taking time to learn the skills to self-generate positive emotions can help us become healthier, more social, more resilient versions of ourselves,” Dr. Fredrickson reported in the National Institutes of Health monthly newsletter in 2015.

In other words, Dr. Davidson said, “well-being can be considered a life skill. If you practice, you can actually get better at it.” By learning and regularly practicing skills that promote positive emotions, you can become a happier and healthier person. Thus, there is hope for people like my friend’s parents should they choose to take steps to develop and reinforce positivity.

In her newest book, “Love 2.0,” Dr. Fredrickson reports that “shared positivity — having two people caught up in the same emotion — may have even a greater impact on health than something positive experienced by oneself.” Consider watching a funny play or movie or TV show with a friend of similar tastes, or sharing good news, a joke or amusing incidents with others. Dr. Fredrickson also teaches “loving-kindness meditation” focused on directing good-hearted wishes to others. This can result in people “feeling more in tune with other people at the end of the day,” she said.

Activities Dr. Fredrickson and others endorse to foster positive emotions include:

Do good things for other people. In addition to making others happier, this enhances your own positive feelings. It can be something as simple as helping someone carry heavy packages or providing directions for a stranger.

Appreciate the world around you. It could be a bird, a tree, a beautiful sunrise or sunset or even an article of clothing someone is wearing. I met a man recently who was reveling in the architectural details of the 19th-century houses in my neighborhood.

Develop and bolster relationships. Building strong social connections with friends or family members enhances feelings of self-worth and, long-term studies have shown, is associated with better health and a longer life.

Establish goals that can be accomplished. Perhaps you want to improve your tennis or read more books. But be realistic; a goal that is impractical or too challenging can create unnecessary stress.

Learn something new. It can be a sport, a language, an instrument or a game that instills a sense of achievement, self-confidence and resilience. But here, too, be realistic about how long this may take and be sure you have the time needed.

Choose to accept yourself, flaws and all. Rather than imperfections and failures, focus on your positive attributes and achievements. The loveliest people I know have none of the external features of loveliness but shine with the internal beauty of caring, compassion and consideration of others.

Practice resilience. Rather than let loss, stress, failure or trauma overwhelm you, use them as learning experiences and steppingstones to a better future. Remember the expression: When life hands you a lemon, make lemonade.

Practice mindfulness. Ruminating on past problems or future difficulties drains mental resources and steals attention from current pleasures. Let go of things you can’t control and focus on the here-and-now. Consider taking a course in insight meditation.

 

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

April 13, 2017

Obesity Quadruples Diabetes Risk for Most US Adults

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , — admin @ 10:02 AM

Obesity Quadruples Diabetes Risk for Most US Adults

by Dan Witters and Diana Liu

Learn More Here

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Diabetes Rates by Age

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Obesity linked to diabetes across all age groups
  • Among obese adults, increased risk of diabetes highest from ages 35 to 39
  • Obesity elevates diabetes risk more for women than for men

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Obese adults between the ages of 25 and 64 are at least four times more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes than those who are normal weight, according to the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. By their mid-to-late 30s, 9.3% of adults who are obese have been diagnosed with diabetes, compared with 1.8% among those who are normal weight. These results are based on nearly 500,000 interviews conducted in the U.S. from 2014 through 2016 as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.

Unlike some government estimates of obesity, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index uses respondents’ self-reported height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI) and subsequent weight classes. It does not involve clinical measurements that typically result in higher obesity estimates. A BMI of 30 or higher results in an obese classification. Additionally, the Well-Being Index does not discern between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, but rather asks: “Has a doctor or nurse ever told you that you have diabetes?”

In 2016, 28.4% of all U.S. adults were classified as obese, and 11.6% reported having been diagnosed with diabetes. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have estimated that about one in three Americans born in the year 2000 will be diagnosed with diabetes in their lifetime, and that the percentage of Americans with the disease will at least double from current levels by the year 2050.

Not all individuals who are obese will develop diabetes, and some who are normal weight will get the disease. Factors other than obesity status or age could increase the risk of developing diabetes, including physical inactivity, race and ethnicity, and genetic predisposition.

Still, the odds of having been diagnosed with diabetes are substantially higher among those who are obese than among those who are overweight or normal weight, and remain elevated between the ages of 25 and 64. The peak years of elevated risk are between ages 35 and 39. At this stage in life, obese individuals are over five times more likely than their normal weight counterparts to have been diagnosed with diabetes.

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Women Have Higher Diabetes Risk Because of Obesity

In 2016, women were only slightly more likely than men to report having been diagnosed with diabetes — 11.7% to 11.4%, respectively. Women who are obese, however, are more likely than obese men to have diabetes across all age groups up to age 60, at which point both groups converge.

The increased diabetes risk is considerably higher for obese women than for obese men across most age groups. For example, obese women aged 50 to 54 are six times more likely than women who are normal weight to have diabetes, while obese men of the same age are only about three times more likely than their normal weight counterparts to have diabetes.

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The results of this analysis cannot establish a causal relationship between obesity and diabetes, as individuals are not asked to confirm the age at which they were diagnosed with diabetes and their height and weight at the time of the diagnosis. Some who were obese when interviewed may have been normal weight at an earlier age when they were diagnosed with diabetes, and some who were normal weight (or overweight) at the time of the interview may have been obese at the point of their diagnosis.

The results do, however, add to a significant body of research that demonstrates the unambiguous link between the two diseases: Those who are obese carry a significantly higher risk of developing diabetes.

Implications

Obesity has climbed steadily in the U.S. since 2008, increasing nearly three percentage points to 28.4% in 2016. This means there are now 7 million more U.S. adults who are obese than would have been the case if the rate had held steady at the 2008 level.

Diabetes, in turn, has climbed by one point since 2008, to 11.6%. Every three-point increase in the U.S. obesity rate is associated with a roughly one-point increase in the diabetes rate.

The findings from this analysis show the strength of the relationship between obesity and diabetes, even for young adults. By their mid-to-late 20s, obese individuals are already four times more likely than their normal weight counterparts to have been diagnosed with diabetes. This increased risk only grows over the next decade before peaking between the ages of 35 and 39. As such, communities, businesses and healthcare providers should pursue efforts to curtail obesity at the earliest possible time and with increased urgency.

The costs of obesity are substantial. In unplanned absenteeism alone, obesity and associated chronic conditions have been estimated to cost the U.S. economy $153 billion annually. This economic impact is likely exacerbated given that the obesity-diabetes link is greatest among adults in their prime working years.

Curtailing the relentless climb of obesity and associated chronic conditions such as diabetes can be accomplished. Hospitals can put in place diabetes management programs to help people who have already been diagnosed, as well as diabetes prevention programs for those who are at risk.

“The best diabetes management programs are comprehensive — delivering professional education, inpatient glycemic management, outpatient prevention, and self-management education and support — and they engage multidisciplinary teams for coordinated care,” said Sheila Holcomb, vice president, Sharecare Diabetes Solutions. “They focus on metrics such as achieving glycemic targets and reducing average length of inpatient stays.”

Additionally, at the community level, initiatives like the Blue Zones Project— an organization that specializes in transforming communities across the U.S. into higher well-being places — has compiled many success stories.

For example, between 2010 and 2015 the California Beach Cities (Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach and Hermosa Beach) had a 9.2-point decline in adults who were either overweight or obese, coupled with a 1.1-point decline in diabetes. This was done in part through close planning and cooperation with the Beach Cities Health District to transform both the physical structure of each community and the culture itself, resulting in a population that is healthier and better informed about what is needed to best pursue a life well-lived.

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

April 12, 2017

Bragg Basket Raffle Winner at “Jodi House Hike, Walk, & Roll

Filed under: Bragg General — Tags: , , — admin @ 10:32 AM

Bragg Basket Raffle Winner at “Jodi House Hike, Walk, & Roll

Jodi House empowers brain injury survivors to not merely survive, but thrive.

Learn More about Jodi House

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The lucky winner of Bragg Health Basket came all the way from San Diego!

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Bragg Bags were a hit @ Eling’s Park in SB

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

April 11, 2017

Dr. Patricia Bragg Loves To Dance

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , — admin @ 2:24 PM

Dr. Patricia Bragg Loves To Dance

Music can soothe the soul, and dance can re-energize the body. Together they can create moments of joy, an escape from stress and a connection to your playful side. Live a Bragg Healthy Lifestyle, take time to move and breathe deeply, enjoy the beauty in the world, and dance your way through life. This is how to add years to your life and add life into your years.

Dr. Patricia Dancing

Here is a nice melody

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

A Prophetic Night with Keith & Mary Hudson

Filed under: Bragg General — Tags: , , , — admin @ 1:05 PM

A Prophetic Night with Keith & Mary Hudson
(Katy Perry’s parents)

Mary and Keith Hudson’s event, A Prophetic Night, was very successful

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Mary & Keith Hudson

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Mary & Keith Hudson

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Dr. Patricia Bragg Enjoyed the Event

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Jane a participant

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

“Mark” and his family visit the Bragg farm

Filed under: Bragg General — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:27 PM

“Mark” and his family visit the Bragg Farm

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Mark & his wife Theresa and their beautiful children
with Dr. Patricia Bragg

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The Kids Love Patricia’s Collections

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Mark & his wife Theresa and their beautiful children

Call to Tour the Bragg Farm

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

The Bragg Booth at the 4th Annual Santa Barbara Food & Wine Weekend

Filed under: Bragg Events — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:05 PM

The Bragg Booth at the 4th Annual Santa Barbara
Food & Wine Weekend

Bragg sponsored a booth at the Bacara Resort & Spa and The Julia Child Foundation

Learn More About Bacara Resort & Spa Here

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Allison with Bragg Hosts the Bragg Booth

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A Great Bacara Event

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Participants Received Bragg Bags with Samples

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Participants Enjoyed Bragg Products

Offical Hashtag: #SBFoodWine
Instagram: @BacaraResortSB @JuliaChildFoundation
Twitter: @BacaraResortSB  @JuliaChildJCF
https://www.facebook.com/BacaraResort
https://www.facebook.com/JuliaChild

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles

Filed under: Health News — Tags: , , — admin @ 9:20 AM

The Best Exercise for Aging Muscles

The toll that aging takes on a body extends all the way down to the cellular level. But the damage accrued by cells in older muscles is especially severe, because they do not regenerate easily and they become weaker as their mitochondria, which produce energy, diminish in vigor and number.

study published this month in Cell Metabolism, however, suggests that certain sorts of workouts may undo some of what the years can do to our mitochondria.

Exercise is good for people, as everyone knows. But scientists have surprisingly little understanding of its cellular impacts and how those might vary by activity and the age of the exerciser.

So researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., recently conducted an experiment on the cells of 72 healthy but sedentary men and women who were 30 or younger or older than 64. After baseline measures were established for their aerobic fitness, their blood-sugar levels and the gene activity and mitochondrial health in their muscle cells, the volunteers were randomly assigned to a particular exerciseregimen.

Some of them did vigorous weight training several times a week; some did brief interval training three times a week on stationary bicycles (pedaling hard for four minutes, resting for three and then repeating that sequence three more times); some rode stationary bikes at a moderate pace for 30 minutes a few times a week and lifted weights lightly on other days. A fourth group, the control, did not exercise.

After 12 weeks, the lab tests were repeated. In general, everyone experienced improvements in fitness and an ability to regulate blood sugar.

There were some unsurprising differences: The gains in muscle mass and strength were greater for those who exercised only with weights, while interval training had the strongest influence on endurance.

But more unexpected results were found in the biopsied muscle cells. Among the younger subjects who went through interval training, the activity levels had changed in 274 genes, compared with 170 genes for those who exercised more moderately and 74 for the weight lifters. Among the older cohort, almost 400 genes were working differently now, compared with 33 for the weight lifters and only 19 for the moderate exercisers.

Many of these affected genes, especially in the cells of the interval trainers, are believed to influence the ability of mitochondria to produce energy for muscle cells; the subjects who did the interval workouts showed increases in the number and health of their mitochondria — an impact that was particularly pronounced among the older cyclists.

It seems as if the decline in the cellular health of muscles associated with aging was “corrected” with exercise, especially if it was intense, says Dr. Sreekumaran Nair, a professor of medicine and an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic and the study’s senior author. In fact, older people’s cells responded in some ways more robustly to intense exercise than the cells of the young did — suggesting, he says, that it is never too late to benefit from exercise.

 

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

April 6, 2017

Special Invite: 4/12 Edible SB Spring Issue Release Party @ Cebada Wine

Filed under: Bragg Events — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:22 PM

Special Invite: 4/12 Edible SB Spring Issue Release Party @ Cebada Wine

We’d love for you to join us at our Edible Santa Barbara Spring Issue Release Party next Wednesday, April 12 at Cebada Wine in downtown Santa Barbara.

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Come celebrate the release of the latest issue, network with fellow Edible community members and enjoy a very special wine + appetizer pairing menu, featuring Here’s the Scoop gelato and sorbet, Bree’Osh artisan brioche, and Maudet’s artisan French crepes [see attached flyer for details].

Event is FREE to attend; wine + gelato flights are $12 and wine by the glass is available for purchase.

Here is the link to the Facebook Event where you can RSVP:

RSVP Here

This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

April 5, 2017

Dr. Patricia Bragg invites you to a special “PROPHETIC NIGHT”with her Dear Friends, Keith & Mary Hudson

Filed under: Bragg Events — Tags: , , — admin @ 2:52 PM

Dr. Patricia Bragg invites you to a special “PROPHETIC NIGHT”with her Dear Friends, Keith & Mary Hudson  (Katy Perry’s parents)!

“I will be there to greet you. You will be blessed!” Patricia Bragg

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Come and Enjoy!

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Katy Perry, Dr. Patricia Bragg, and Katy’s Mother Mary Hudson

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APRIL 7 • MAY 5, & JUNE 9
Fridays @ 7:00pm LOUISE LOWRY CENTER
1232 De La Vina St.
951.522.8391

 

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This Blog is moderated. It is created to be informative, inspiring and uplifting. Our positive philosophy at Bragg is to communicate with love and respect. As Paul and Patricia Bragg teach, in expressing your thoughts and opinions to others, ask yourself: "Is it good, is it kind, is it necessary?" All comments that do not fit this philosophy will not be posted.

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